Making Brisket with Justin Johns of Jay's Barbecue 

Share on Facebook
Tweet
Submit to Reddit
Email
Up-and-coming pitmaster and Tucson native Justin Johns spends almost three days straight through making, watching and selling his brisket for his food truck Jay's Barbecue. 
OF 27
PREV NEXT
Heather Hoch
Justin Johns of Jay's Barbecue trims his brisket by hand.
Heather Hoch
Admittedly, Johns has no professional butchery training...
Heather Hoch
...But he does have an arsenal of YouTube videos.
Heather Hoch
Johns says a one-quarter-inch layer of fat is standard for brisket.
Heather Hoch
The Jay's Barbecue smoker was custom designed by Johns.
Heather Hoch
Johns gets the fires going at about 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.
Heather Hoch
Jay's Barbecue uses primarily pecan wood for smoking, though mesquite is also sometimes used supplementally.
Heather Hoch
Johns aims to heat his smoker between 250 and 275 degrees.
Heather Hoch
Time of year can effect everything from humidity to ambient smoker temperature, making barbecue a constantly changing endeavor.
Heather Hoch
Johns checks the fire about every half hour to be sure it maintains its optimum temperature.
Heather Hoch
Johns seasons his brisket generously with salt and pepper.
For Johns, barbecue is about simple flavors that let the meat and cook shine.
Heather Hoch
Johns prepares about 125 pounds of brisket to sell each week.
Heather Hoch
Brisket cooks from approximately 4 p.m. until about 9 a.m. the following day.
Heather Hoch
Heated and ready to smoke, Johns brings brisket to its home for the next 15 hours or so.
Heather Hoch
Johns sprays the brisket and checks to make sure fat isn't pooling at the top.
Heather Hoch
For Johns, the bark of a brisket is just about the most important part, though he admits nothing will bum a 'cue fan out quicker than dry brisket.
Heather Hoch
The smoker offers two temperatures for Johns—hotter near the top and slightly cooler toward the bottom.
Heather Hoch
Jay's Barbecue has been parked off of Stone Avenue since February.
Heather Hoch
Johns seasons pork butt for his pulled pork.
Heather Hoch
Settling in for the night, Johns sits in front of his smoker and waits.
Heather Hoch
Nine hours later, Johns is still tending to his smoker and keeping a watchful eye on the meat inside.
Heather Hoch
Johns gives his brisket another spray before wrapping it.
Heather Hoch
Johns typically uses foil when he's cooking brisket in higher volume, though using foil is called the "Texas crutch."
Heather Hoch
Jay's Barbecue brisket is wrapped for the last final hours of cooking—sometimes in foil, sometimes in butcher paper.
Heather Hoch
Johns prefers butcher paper wrapping because he feels the bark turns out better with this method.
Heather Hoch
Jay's Barbecue currently offers brisket, pulled pork, ribs, baked beans, coleslaw and potato salad; Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (or until sell out).
More slideshows
Heather Hoch38 images
1/27
Heather Hoch
Justin Johns of Jay's Barbecue trims his brisket by hand.

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

 

Add a comment