Marijuana Policy Project's Legal Weed Ballot Measure Hits 75,000 Signatures

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Legal mota is getting closer to the ballot. - COURTESY OF PHOTOSPIN
  • Courtesy of Photospin
  • Legal mota is getting closer to the ballot.

Things are looking good in the legal weed world, at least for the ballot measure being pushed by the Marijuana Policy Project, which has already gathered more than 75,000 signatures. They are one-third of the way into their goal of at least 230,000, according to an MPP press release. 

Their initiative—called the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol—only needs 150,000 sigs to make the ballot. But MPP has said they will hand the Secretary of  State's Office a decent amount more, in case there are issues of invalid signatures. MPP launched its petition drive back in May, and within a few weeks they already had 25,000 signatures and more than $300,000 raised. 

“We’re finding that more than one out of every two registered voters we ask to sign is happy to do it, so that’s a good sign,” said campaign chairman J.P. Holyoak in the press release. “People recognize that marijuana prohibition has been just as big of a mess as alcohol prohibition was 80 years ago. It’s time for a more sensible approach.”

The proposed initiative would allow adults 21 and older to possess limited amounts of weed; cultivate six plants per person or 12 total in a household; establish 15 percent tax on retail marijuana sales, with much of the revenue going toward Arizona schools and public education programs, among other guidelines. MPP recently said they expect to see at least $40 million annually invested in education thanks to the revenue. (Opponents don't care about how much money this could bring to education. They argue the harm would be greater than the millions. Read more, here.

“Most voters seem to recognize that marijuana is less harmful than alcohol and that we’d be better off if we started treating it that way,” Holyoak said in the statement. “It makes little sense to criminalize adults for choosing to use a product that is safer than one you can currently buy in a grocery store. Regulating and taxing marijuana like alcohol just makes sense.”

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