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Cheap Thrills

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Still going and going and ... The 24th event in the Tucson Songwriter Showcase Concert Series features the music of multi-instrumentalist Mark Holdaway.

Guest performers Dave Irwin and Kevin Firth--who hail from Tucson and Toronto, respectively--join in for a great evening in a friendly, acoustic, non-smoking setting.

The free concert begins at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at the Hazy Dayz Lounge Cafe, 187 N. Park Ave. at the corner of East Ninth Street. For more information, call 749-1880.

Get lost. Eat some tacos and get your fill of family fun.

Join the Artists for Art's Sake and merchants from the Lost Barrio district Saturday, March 30, for a spirited day of creativity. Participants will be invited to create in chalk drawings, throw pottery, draw on metal, make cascarones, eat tacos and enjoy music.

Artists from Art on the Lawn are back to present this Art on the Streets event, a panorama of some of the best artwork Tucson has to offer.

The event is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, on South Park Avenue in the blocks just south of East Broadway. For more information, call 327-1187 or 882-8099.

Death of an exhibition. Life's short, and time's also running out on Ancient Skins, a mixed-media art exhibition that digs around in the themes of aging, death and rebirth.

The show in the Tucson-Pima Arts Council's Community Gallery, featuring Tucson artists Michael Cajero, Catherine Nash, and Robert Renfrow, will feature sculpture, alternative photographic processes, environmental installations and hand-made books.

The works in the show cumulatively explore the ephemeral and impermanent aspects of nature. The process of time, decay and dying are embodied in paper and fabric.

Most of these art works are created from the organic fibers of dead plants, which are recontextualized into a new form; the artists agree that this fact allows for the symbolic exploration and expression of ideas about the human condition, the cycles of existence and the concept of mortality.

In that pursuit, Ancient Skins is a series of pieces, both two- and three-dimensional, that address aging, death and rebirth. The idea is that humans are born into a cycle of growth, death and decay shared by all life forms.

It'd be wise to act fast: Ancient Skins closes April 4. The gallery is located Downtown at 240 N. Stone Ave., a block north of the Tucson-Pima Public Library's main branch. Hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call 624-0595, ext. 26, fax: 624-3001 or visit www.tucsonpimaartscouncil.org.

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